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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
is not green. it will cause a lot of problems with the environment and they're worried about global warming. look at a cover from april of 1975, time cover that says, how to survive the coming ice age. if you lookdown, there is a story on mash in there. science on global warming has been debunked time and time again, has it not? >> yes it has. but eric, i'm not smart enough to understand it. i'm happy i'm on the cover of time. i have no idea what -- i don't think anybody really can scientifically say definitely one way or the other. but that's not the point. i think the point is this oil is going to go somewhere else. it doesn't matter. so for the environment, it's going to hurt the world environment regardless because the chinese are going to shmutz the world just as much as anybody else. >> we'll leave it there. thank you so sandra smith and julie for joining us this week. >> thanks. >> coming up, notice a runup lately in your 401(k)? now some lawmakers are looking to get their greedy little hands on it. tracy tells you how to protect yourself from those greedy little hands djibouti, afri
. the president left washington today for the comparatively grownup environment of a room full of 4-year-olds. it went well. that's coming up. i was in the ambulance and i was told to call my next of kin. at 33 years old, i was having a heart attack. now i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i didn't know this could happen so young. take control, talk to your doctor. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. all stations come over to mithis is for real this ti
washington today for the comparatively grownup environment of a room full of 4-year-olds. went well. hold on. that's coming up. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmission. [ coyote howls ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it
, leader in the backcourt. evans fighting a flu bug. bruce mike bruesewitz. a fantastic environment here at the kohl center. our officials. opening tip controlled to the buckeyes. >> bill: man-to-man. great environment, isn't it? >> tim: it really is. our first trip in here and it is magnificent. >> bill: nice, empty side, ball screen. the southpaw, prettiy stroke. >> tim: deshaun, junior from fort wayne, indiana, he has one magnif cent stroke. here is bruesewitz right on cue answering and we're tied at 2-2 just 30 seconds deep. >> bill: how do you play it? pindown on the catch. solid, organized offensive play. a lot of clock. nice penetration. >> tim: williams was not ready it seemed for the past from lenzelle smith, seemed startled to get it. >> bill: bruesewitz does so many things to help this team. on the defensive end, there he is with a screen. >> tim: wonderful charismatic personality too. ryan evans missed critical free throws in the narrow loss to minnesota earlier in the week, did not practice yesterday because of a stomach virus. >> bill: psychologically, that was a big basket
, in a political environment like congress? >> and, of course, as mark kelly has been pointing out. tucson wouldn't have happened in there were background checks. there's an economic message that the president is trying to convey. how difficult is this if he does not lay out the kind of specific alternative to the sequester that republicans are demanding in the house side? >> well, here's what's hard, ab drae. if he is going to talk about how we need to invest in infrastructure and education and all these other things, republicans will say wait, wait, wait. the problem we have is a spending problem. the deficit is running out of control. i would point you on pew that did some fascinating polling about people's priorities in january 2009 and january 2013. the fastest majority is reducing duj been fets. it will be interesting how much he focus on that behavior. snoo meanwhile, you are looking at live pictures of vatican city. the college of card mals will be convene says next month. could they picture first nonusual eastern to eat the national catholic church. you are watching the east room at the
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment.
environment then. we didn't have public sector unions. we didn't have all these regulatory barriers. the problem is that the things that rick talks about are so much more expensive when administered by the government than they would be by the private sector. >> you got ten seconds, wrap it up. >> working today! it's 20 and. it's working now. it's -- >> no it's not. >> it's also working in flint, michigan, this exact program. it's bringing business in. doing all the things you like. >> we got to wrap it up at that. coming up, mountain dew. as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity no-fee ira.
sentence in a more open prison environment. evidences sentenced to life in a bombing that killed 6 people and injured more than 1,000 in new york city. >> class is in session for these teachers in palm harbor florida looking to learn how to handle a gun. they were offered a concealed permit course for he had dierts in the area. >> if you are confident with the weapon confident with your skills educated and trained properly you will understand how the weapon works you are not going to be afraid of it and you are going to control the weapon instead of the weapon controlling you. >> the concealed weapons in the classroom once they have completed the course but instructors say the class is still valuable. >> they have a big announcement for those who love it. they announced they were cutting the alcohol content of which is see due to a shortage. it is prompting makers mark to restore the alcohol volume back to the historic 90s proof and tweet the company's foirnled skunlers you spoke we listen. there you go. >> her father died a hero in world war ii before she was ever born. decades after he
be potentially serious problem. you have to realize this is a captive audience. this is a closed environment. and many things could potentially go wrong. in general, carnival and all the other cruise lines are very good about dealing with these situations. >> i know you're a doctor and not an attorney, but i'm wondering if the illnesses that came as a result are real enough to where any kind of lawsuits would have a standing chance in court? >> again, i'm definitely not an attorney, but in general, there's a possibility that they could prove a case. anyone that flies or drives or gets in a ship knows there are a risks to that. this is kind of an unusual situation, but i would say the litigation would be handled appropriately. >> doctor, while the passengers may have gotten off the ship, are there any sort of lingering concerns out there? could there be illnesses or injuries that develop after they've left the ship? >> that's a great question. potentially, i would be careful to look for bacterial infections, diarrhea. people could be very stressed about this afterwards. post-traumatic stress
to be a unit with n an open environment where inmates are allowed outside their cells for no less than 14 hours a day. a federal judge is to rule on this interesting request very soon. >> united nations investigators say both sides are committing war crimes in serbia syria. they aexcuse fighters and rebels of violating all kinds of laws, including murder, rape and torture in the two-year conflicted that has now killed an estimated 70,000 men, women and children. they captured a key government checkpoint in aleppo. they reportedly captured an army base but control of that airport could mark a huge win for the opposition and could potentially spark a major shift in syria's civil war. >> we're getting a look at hagel's response to one of his toughest critics and it's apparently helping his chances to become the next defense secretary. white house says it's just a back-up plan but some republicans say, a new report is making them wonder whether president obama really wants to cut a deal on immigration reform. what is coming up as we approach the bottom of the hour and the top of the news. to grow,
environment, it may not actually make the most sense. if you're paying less than 4% on your mortgage, if you can -- you can take that money and put it into retirement investing, you could make even conservatively 4%, 6%. that may be a smarter way to spend that savings. >> okay. what if i'm in debt? how do i deal with the debt issues and save for retirement? >> here's something that might be a little controversial. but you don't want to enter retirement with a lot of high priced debt. what we're talking about are credit cards, maybe student loans that you took on for your kids or auto loans. you want to pay that off. you might be paying 8% 10%, 12% on. that here's the controversial part -- maybe for a while you want to step back your retirement savings and put this money into paying down that debt. if you're paying 12% on debt that's going sap your retirement. nay off as soon as you can. >> donna rosato. thank you. >>> from saving your money to saving your strength. a ceo of an energy project explains why you might be more productive just by taking it easy. she'll explai
environment? >> no, i don't think cruz is the symbol of a deeper problem. i think senator cruz, you know, you hear whispers about this that he's rubbing some people the wrong way. and by the way, these whispers are coming from other republicans as well as democrats. it's by bipartisan, but that is more of the hey, you're the new guy, you know, why don't you learn the ropes here and play by a more civil set of rules? but i don't think -- i think that's -- i do think on the senate side, i'm with senator coburn. there really is more at least a friendlier atmosphere. senators actually -- bipartisan senators actually go to lunch together. >> you need to remember how uncivil i was supposedly accused of being when i got here when i took on ted stevens and arlen specter. there's no change. you work your way into the senate. you build relationships, and then you work bipartisanly. >> let me just say, i mean, i've known you for a long time, tom. you were uncivil. and then you grew a beard and you've become an elder statesman of sorts. >> elder is the only correct word that could be associated with me.
on the mind the security environment of china. >> okay. so i think we will leave it there, but we appreciate your insight your experience. that was a former south korean foreign minister joining us on the line. spelling out exactly what could happen over the next couple days. we did touch on it there, the role that china could play. the united states will be looking toward beijing to take a leadership role because of the influence that the chinese have over their closest friends, the north koreans. but right now we will say good-bye to our viewers in the united states. but for everyone else here at cnn international, we'll continue on with our coverage of this breaking news story. let's go to matthew chance who is live in beijing. for more on this, it is the chinese new year holiday. the place is closed down, you can shoot a cannon down the main street of beijing and not hit anybody. when can we expect something to come out of the government there? >> it's very difficult to say. >> a war in the gop. between donald trump calling karl rove a total loser and the dualing responses to the state o
environment. here he is holed up in an apartment that almost has a view directly on the command post on the other side of the road with an automatic sniper rifle with .50 caliber sniper bullets. you have to ask yourself two questions. one, when his truck broke down and he took off with the weapons that he could carry, was that the first place he could get into? or, two, did he choose it because it would give him an observation post and potentially a target? >> are you aware how far the broken down truck was from that location? >> i was told it's not that far away. i haven't been there. this might have been the first place he encountered. or he might have hid and found his way back to it. about the search, because you asked about that, they would check houses and if there was any forced entry, they would go in and check that house to determine did that have anything to do with him, was he still there? if there were houses unlocked, they would check those. but where there was sign of no forced entry, generally that was a sign to them that this was in tact. in general -- there were some
go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe and the way you think, after, you know, time, you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. i don't think it's in any way justifiable, someone going out and killing anyone because they're stressed out at work. there are ways and outlets of releasing stress. chris unfortunately was one of those people he bottled up a lot of his emotions and wasn't very good at expressing himself. >> he didn't have close friends? he didn't talk to his mom? >> i believe he did have a good relationship with his mother and some of his close friends, but even, i think, in the manifesto he lists how he just sort of alienated himself from everyone towards the end. >> did he think he was better than everyone else? that manifesto is so narcissistic, isn't it? >> completely. everything is i was always the best and somehow i was done wrong. >> i mentioned that yesterday. one time i think maybe sort of as a light note -- i kind of have to laugh about something in this or else it makes you a little crazy in y
the merits of the way he trains. ill he' say in the training environment, the reason it's not a public video when you're doing any kind of training it evokes a lot of emotions to people and in this case to diversity. at usda a big part of the work they're doing is working with migrant workers and populations in fact broadly minority and i think that that's important that exists. there's a reason by the way, fortune 500 companies invest in this training because it does impact the way a workplace environment works, there's data to support that. spending in in area is important giving the work they do. we can question his training style and what worked and didn't for you, but i think the value of it is inherent in the data that does exist out there. >> the business we should make them say-- referring it pilgrims as illegal aliens, illegal immigrants, get some pushback and people want them referred to as undocumented workers. it's interesting to see that federal taxpayers effectively taking a side by saying, you if you use the term illegal alien, it's racist, it's got, you know, it's completely
that caused wild fires that changed the environment so much dinosaurs could no longer survive. and for generations humans have been trying to understand the how's and why's of these missiles from outer space. >> this is probably the largest exhibit in the world in terms of meteorites on display. >> reporter: the smithsonian museum of natural history has amassed a major collection of them, overseen by linda wellsinback. this looks like a piece of sculpture. >> iron meteorites are interesting in many ways because they are fragments of an asteroid that has been completely disrupted. we're getting pieces of something that at one time was a full planet. >> reporter: in fact, most of the meteorites that land on earth come from the asteroid belt, an area between mars and jupiter where space debris collects. here is a little space terminology. asteroids are minor planet-like objects that usually orbit the sun. meteoroids are much smaller bodies. when either enters the earth's atmosphere it's known as a meteor. after it hits the earth it's called a meteorite. you've got 50,000 meteorit
with the political environment that he came out of and i think that, you know, it's giving me a little bit more insight going back with these folks for quite a long period of time. although they don't all like what i put in the book about them. >> talk about your kids. are you a tough dad? >> i'm not a tough dad. they tend to run roughshod over me a fair amount of time. they do it in a generally respectful way. i think i'm now getting out of the eyeball roll years where they react that way to me. i'm moving to a better place with them which is good. >> this is hysterical. the eyeball roll years. i'm in those. take me to the take your kids to workday with mikhail gorbechev. >> it was ten years ago when mikhail was in new york. i had an interview scheduled with him. i brought them to meet gorbechev. they sat through the interview. the picture came out and a friend said that is from the wax museum? i said no. that is gorbechev. >> his book, "the center holds" will be in bookstores in may. >>> next weekend, my interview with former new york mayor david dinkins. >>> then the oscar winning actor fals
. whatever environment they're in we've got to take on a role. that's purposeful but the surprise is that these young people are just like every other young person everywhere else. >> you say like every other young person. are they seek guidance as well? ? >> it is the perception. sa lot a lot of what's saving them is i find them to be extremely engaging inquisitive. they have the same hopes and as pier ragss as everyone else. they don't have the same beginnings. they don't have the same opportunities. there are a lot of obstacles that many of these young people none of us have never had to face. >> i always believe if kids don't think you care they don't care what you think. and at your school it says four principals in the last six years. are you staying? >> i'm staying. listen. some of these kids the lives of these young people will be with me for the rest of my life. they have impacted me in ways i never expected. i think if you talked to my teachers they'd say the same. what i know is they need stability and continuity and right now we're seeing positive cha
are fine. there were some pretty crazy things going on, just because of the enclosed environment and the facilities that everybody was having to go through. some people went off on people. i mean, it wasn't very nice. you just had to do what you had to do. >>steve: you did have to do what you did. and you're home. later today. we understand you're still in where right now? >> i'm still in mobile, alabama right now. >>steve: how are you going to get home? >> my husband with a so loving and kind, he drove all the way, eight hours, from texas to pick me up. >>steve: that is what a husband does on valentines night if he is smart. we're glad everybody is off the boat safely although we did hear one or two people were transported off the boat last night in mobile by ambulance and taken to a local hospital. thanks, brandi. >>alisyn: let's tell you what else is happening. panic overnight in russia after a massive meteorite comes crashing down. [screaming] >>alisyn: those were screams of horror. this happened in mountains. the meteorite streaking through the sky. right now reports show mo
just had an environment that was a little more forgiving. so when i screwed up, the consequences weren't as high as when kids on the south side screw up. >> reporter: the president also took a broader approach to solving the issue of gun violation, arguing the problem is rooted in economic inequalities and broken homes. and on this point, he got personal, too. >> don't get me wrong. as the son of a single mom who gave everything she had to raise me with the help of my grandparents, i turned out okay. but at the same time, i wish i'd had a father who was around and involved. >> reporter: while this isn't the first time the president has talked about being raised by a single mom, political analysts say friday's intimate appeal may be indicative of a more aggressive president obama. now, since the tragedy in newtown, alex, president obama has been making a more emotional appeal to get stiffer gun legislation passed. that is an uphill battle he's going to have once he leaves his vacation here in florida. another fight he's going to face with congress, of course, over the sequester, those d
environments. it could be no mistake that he chose this condo complex and this cabin to set up shop. earlier in a press conference last night, the couple made some very eerie comments, unsettling comments saying dorner may have been watching them. take a listen. >> talked about how he could see jim working on the snow every day. >> he had been watching us, saw me shoveling the snow. that was friday. >> we never saw any indication that he was in there. >> and dorner tried to re-assure the couple that he was not going to kill them or harm them. he kept repeating over and over, john, that he just wanted to clear his name, just wanted to clear his name. >> the deputies, officials had been searching this area for days. have any given any explanation on how they missed him. >> no. i think they need to. there's a lot of reporters wondering how they missed him. they were cagey about that when asked by reporters yesterday in that very same press conference, san bernardino sheriff's office still leaving many questions unanswered. take a listen to what they had to say. >> i can tell you that the cabin
in syria is it makes the operational environment much easier for al-qaeda and its allies. they can operate in cairo. they can have public demonstrations in cairo with mubarak gone and it doesn't hurt them. they don't get arrested or chased out of the country. so the changing middle east has played to the strengths of al-qaeda and certainly in terms of the pressure on them, except for pakistan, the pressure is off. >> brian: when you mentioned on the radio show to me that you're worried about your grandchildren and the world in which we are right now, we're cutting back and almost saying the enemy doesn't exist. >> well, it's not almost, brian. people like john brennan and the president, who have gone out of their way to say that jihad is like a rotary club for the world. they're just self-improving muslims. they've gone out of the way to make americans believe the danger and the threat in the world is reduced. and the combination of that lie with the cuts in the defense budget are certainly not good news for american security. >> brian: john brennan, we just saw video of him. he's poised t
the partisan thing, and to build those coalitions out of the middle and very hard in this toxic environment. >> and also, coming up, a growing epidemic for the nation's youth, adder roall addiction and why a misdiagnosis can be fatal. we will talk to a columnist ellen schwartz, about the deadly case of one young man. and we will talk to stephanie cutter and also latino fellow from the university of texas, dr. francesco soto, but first, here is bill karins with the weather forecast. >> connecticut is not a fun place to be after the heels of the big blizzard and now dealing with freezing rain. one of the busiest highways i-95 has a overturned tractor-trailer and car on it, and that the idea of not traveling in massachusetts or connecticut, and just wait another couple of hours, because it will warm up and be rain. but right now, freezing rain is widespread in southern new england, and temperatures are warming up. new haven at 36 and providence 37 and so plenty of cold air for that freezing rain and snow and sleet there in massachusetts and new hampshire. we had the tornado yesterday, and it t
, not kraft but heinz back in 2006. this is what he had to say about the deal making environment. >> i think there are many more deals coming. i'll say it again. that's why we made our investment last year. we think m and a is back, revenue market is hard to come by. i think most of corporate america feel they have skinnied down their operations to a point where they can't get much more out of it. so synergies are the next wave of eps growth. >> on this valentine's day he seems to be correct worth noting $182 billion of transactions so far this year. that compares to last year only $58 billion. also by the way, a big payday for the bankers on wall street. there could be fees of $100 million involved in this transaction. the big winners, centerview, moells, berkshire, lazard, jpmorgan, wells fargo. that's it on this valentine's day. not just this deal, so many others, the airlines, comcast, our parent with nbc. so it's -- we might have more. we'll see what happens next monday. >> your great discussion with buffett this morning, andrew. he did lay out the notion there is more money to play wit
in this environment. we had to raise them because of the acuity of an economic crisis. we now have an operating balance budget for the first time in a decade. california's beginning to click back. do not count us out. >> right. you know, though, gavin, though, you have always been straightforward and i've always respected you a great deal. you're a progressive politician, but you understand what it takes to bring small businesses to california. you've been concerned about high tax rates in california for a long time. >> yeah. >> and you're exactly right. whether it's rick perry who we've made a lot of fun of over the past year. you talk about rick scott. they are obsessed with bringing jobs back to their states. and it worked. what does california do? what does new york do? what does connecticut do? what do these states do that have this high tax burden and also have a lot of debt to pay off? how do they balance that with staying competitive for the next decade? >> well, the most important thing these states do is what california and new york, to degree have done, and that's deal with solvency.
pushed to ban styrofoam in manhattan. >> it's not just terrible for the environment. it's another thing that's terrible for the taxpayers. styrofoam increases the cost of recycling by as much as $20 per ton because it has to be removed, something we know is environmentally destructive that is costing taxpayers money and that is easily replaceable, i think is something we can do without. >> joining me michael barbareau covers mayor bloomberg for "the no, times." good to see you. >> good to be here. >> he wants to take styrofoam out of new york city stores and restaurants. how feetible is th ibfeasible i? >> entirely feasible. this is like the cockroach of trash. >> the cockroach of trash. >> it never dies, it doesn't biodegrade, it breaks apart, ends up in the water system, being 20,000 tons of it in the city's landfills and he thinks it's unnecessary. >> and we think this is something that he can get done before he leaves office? >> yes. he's had a little more difficulty with banning other things like a 32-ounce soda but this one it appears can he get done through the city council which
health care environment run by the federal government in the united states. >> right. >> peter: what do people do to respond? >> you know, i actually get asked a lot. people come up to me, oh, the government did x, fill in the blank, whatever it might be. can we sue them? the answer most of the time is no, because most of what they do is addressed in elections. you don't like what they're doing, vote differently and show up and vote and not everybody does, of course. but there are a lot of times -- i mean, this is our second lawsuit with the epa where they're breaking the law. while this has been a both republican and democrat phenomenon in the past, we've never seen an administration so aggressive about it. we walk through example after example of how bigger government, federal government, is breaking the law over and over and how states are pushing back. but you asked about individuals. there are times when the state cannot step in, where it takes an individual person or an individual company to actually fight back and other americans count on those people to do that. but for a lot of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)